Your Story

Here is where you can send your story about your experience related to Meningitis. Send us your story to fund@meningitis.ca and we will review it and post it on this page.

In Memoriam

These stories are of children and young adults who have died of meningitis and septicemia. Over and above the common cause of death is the speed, the moments it seems, between the first symptoms and last breath and the extraordinary need to be more aware of this disease. The stories are here to help survivors - parents and grandparents - deal with the aching grief and to ease the suffering of others with the knowledge that they are not alone.

Michael Longo's mother, Kathryn Blain, tells his story
Michael Longo

In the beginning, meningitis can be so easily overlooked. On Thursday, Michael told me his back was hurting. We didn't think anything of it because he had been helping me with garden clean up for a day or two before. On Friday, he said he was feeling a little off, but not sick enough to stay home. That night he went to a party at a friend's. Saturday morning the tidal wave struck.

Tye's grandma tells the story of her grandson
Tye

On Wednesday, Tye was playing in the park with his grandma. The next day he was lethargic but well enough to eat Popsicles and watch TV. The next morning, he woke and wanted to go outside but fell asleep again. That afternoon, he died.

Sherry Webster tells the story of her son
Matthew David Webster

It has been 4 ½ long months since we lost our beautiful son Matthew to this deadly disease. It has left our whole family in shock. Matthew comes from a large family; he has 4 brothers Chris 18, Jeffrey 13, Richard 10, Michael 8 and 1 sister Racheal who was 5. He also leaves to mourn 9 uncles, 8 aunts, 29 cousins, grandmas & grandpas, and of course his mom & dad.

Bonnie Danylyshen tells her son's story
Brett Michael Martin Danylyshen

Our son Brett was a first year Business Administration student at NAIT. He lived by himself in his own apartment, which he had just moved into in July. Before that he lived with his older brother Nicholas while he worked at PeBen Industries in Nisku. He was just getting into the swing of things at NAIT when he got sick. We, Bonnie and Bernie, live in Veteran which is a good three-hour drive south east of Edmonton. He called me at seven o´clock in the morning on October 4. He said he didn´t feel good, that he was sick the day before and he had gone to a doctor at the Doxx in the Kingsway Mall.

Desirea tells the story of her sister
Bridgid M. Block

Desirea was only four years old when a bad dream woke her in the morning. Her nine-year-old sister was already very ill, even though she had been feeling fine, playing outdoors the evening before. The girls' mother still doesn't want to talk about that day.  

Survivor Stories

Some of the people here have suffered through meningitis without any after effects. Others still carry its scars. But they allsurvived and their stories mayinspire others to endure or their families to hope.

Denise Ganier at the age of 14 tells her story
A Week I will Never Forget

Mom made Denise go to school on Monday, in spite of her sore throat. It was June, near the end of the school year, every day was important, and she had a presentation to make. However, by 4 a.m. on Wednesday, she was in hospital in a coma. Despite her apparent distress, doctors could not find the cause right away. Fortunately they did in time and a week later she was home with a new appreciation for life.

Leyah's grandmother, Fiona, tells her story
Persistence May have Saved a Child's Life

Leyah had a cold, not unusual for a two-year-old. Two days later she had symptoms of meningitis but the hospital suspected pneumonia. Fiona felt it was more and was persistent. Her instincts were accurate. A few hours later, doctors told Fiona and her daughter that Leyah might not make it through the night. After a seven-day battle with meningitis Leyah became what her doctors and nurses still call a "Miracle Baby".

Helen Smith tells her own story
Early Diagnosis Takes on new Meaning

Christmas Day, 1997, Helen had a sore throat. On Boxing Day, she had the symptoms of meningitis but was told she had the flu, then food poisoning before another physician suspected the true cause. On December 27th she walked with her own legs for the last time to the ambulance. Her fight with meningococcal septicemia was overwhelming. She suffered amputations and skin grafts but she survived and her story is compelling.  
Buy Bracelet
Phone or Fax - (519) 664-0244
or Toll-free 1-800-643-1303
E-mail - fund@meningitis.ca
Disclaimer
P.O. Box 28015 R.P.O. Parkdale
Waterloo, Ontario N2L 6J8
Charitable Registration # 89751 8429 RR0001
Join Us on Facebook Follow Us on Twitter